North American Journal of Medical Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 647--652

Clinical spectrum of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: A 10 year experience in an urban area of south


Nitin Joseph1, Deepak Madi2, Ganesh S Kumar3, Maria Nelliyanil4, Vittal Saralaya5, Sharada Rai6 
1 Department of Community Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Internal Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Community Medicine, JIPMER, Puducherry, India
4 Department of Community Medicine, A J Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
5 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
6 Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Nitin Joseph
Department of Community Medicine, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Light House Hill Road, Mangalore, Karnataka
India

Background: Rheumatic fever (RF) is an important problem concerning developing countries like India. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is one of the most readily preventable chronic diseases. Aim: This study was done to find out the clinical profile, risk factors, compliance with treatment and outcome among RF/RHD cases so as to suggest better case management strategies. Materials and Methods: Clinical records of 51 RF and 71 RHD cases admitted in tertiary care hospitals in Mangalore between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Mean age of RF cases were 17.4 ± 12.1 years and RHD cases were 33.2 ± 18.6 years. More than half of RF and RHD cases were males. Commonest risk factors among RF cases were poor socioeconomic status (60.4%), history of upper respiratory tract infection before disease onset (58.8%) and undernutrition (35.3%). Commonest clinical manifestation among RF cases was fever 39 (76.5%) followed by polyarthritis 34 (66.7%). Commonest valvular lesions among RHD cases was mitral stenosis with mitral regurgitation found in 42.9% cases. Compliance of patients with prophylactic antibiotics was found to be 37 (30.3%). Mortality rate was significantly more among RHD cases (P = 0.0399). Conclusions: Improvement of socioeconomic and nutritional factors is an important task required for primary prophylaxis and of compliance for secondary prophylaxis of RF.


How to cite this article:
Joseph N, Madi D, Kumar GS, Nelliyanil M, Saralaya V, Rai S. Clinical spectrum of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: A 10 year experience in an urban area of south.North Am J Med Sci 2013;5:647-652


How to cite this URL:
Joseph N, Madi D, Kumar GS, Nelliyanil M, Saralaya V, Rai S. Clinical spectrum of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: A 10 year experience in an urban area of south. North Am J Med Sci [serial online] 2013 [cited 2022 May 22 ];5:647-652
Available from: https://www.najms.org/article.asp?issn=1947-2714;year=2013;volume=5;issue=11;spage=647;epage=652;aulast=Joseph;type=0